Krakow is a city known for its beauty and rich cultural heritage, and it’s fast becoming one of the hottest tourist destinations in Europe. With its dramatic architecture and scenic river views, it’s easy to believe you’re in another world. Here’s out look at just a few of the must-see attractions in this historic city.


Zakrzowek Quarry

Zakrzowek Lake was formed in 1990 when a limestone quarry flooded. This hidden lagoon, so hidden that some doubt its existence, is a mere 20-minute walk from Wawel Castle. The sheer limestone cliffs and dense foliage which surround the lake, combined with its deep turquoise waters, make it a truly stunning sight. Although the lake itself, and its associated swimming and diving activities, are closed until 2021 due to a renovation project intended to turn it into a public attraction, you can still hike around the perimeter and take in its natural beauty.


Kopiec KoA›ciuszki Mound

Although there’s been a lot of speculation on the subject, with theories ranging from burial grounds to memorials, no one is entirely sure what the purpose of these man-made mounds is. Four of them are thought to have been made during the 1st and 2nd century, while a fifth was added in the 14th century - the Esterka Mound. Legend has it that it was built to honour the king’s lover, Esterka, who threw herself from a window when she learned that he had been unfaithful. Sadly, the fifth mound was demolished in the 1970s to make way for a football stadium. Regardless of their purpose or the reason for their presence, the Krakow Mounds are truly a sight to behold.


Tyniec Abbey

Perched on sheer cliffs above the Vistula River and surrounded by a plethora of trees, Tyniec Abbey could easily be mistaken for something out of Harry Potter or the Chronicles of Narnia. This remarkable monastery has stood for more than a thousand years, reflecting the changing architectural styles through the ages - notably Romanesque, gothic, and baroque. The Abbey was closed in 1816, but after more than a century, the Benedictine monks returned and have restored the monastery to its former glory. There is a museum and a coffee shop on site, and the monks organize seminars and retreats. There’s even a guest house in a portion of the monastery for those seeking a spiritual respite.


 

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